marcopantella

———– Writer / Music re-views / inter-views / and my points of view ———– The GROUND Magazine / HungerTV

Month: December, 2012

Patrick Wolf / Interview

My interview with Patrick Wolf on Hunger TV. Read it here:

PART I  PART II

Eclectic musician Patrick Wolf has never felt confined by the constraints of the music industry – much to many record labels’ annoyance – and demonstrates this in both his music and attitude. This year marks his tenth anniversary in the spotlight and to celebrate Patrick released ‘Sundark and Riverlight’, the most stripped back, musically aware record of his career. We sit down with him to talk openly about his thoughts on the state of the music industry and why he will never fall into the stereotype of ‘what a gay man should be’.

In part two of his frank interview with Hunger TV Patrick Wolf opens up about his grievances with Great Britain, calling it a dystopian reality nightmare, and tells us why he’s hungry for real musicians.

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YOUR LATEST ALBUM ‘SUNDARK AND RIVERLIGHT’ CELEBRATES TEN YEARS OF YOUR ARTISTIC CAREER. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THIS JOURNEY?

It is a moment of discipline to me, I am always hungry to move forward to the next project but it has been useful as a writer to look back at my body of work from an outside perspective, from a place of criticism in order to realise mistakes, strengths and what I could do better. It is a good thing to do and I have learnt a lot about myself and the patterns I need to break. “Sundark And Riverlight” was about choosing the strongest bits and messages out of my songs and applying them to this acoustic and classical formula in a way to purify the music and making it bare essential. I wanted to see if they would be intact without all the decorations. I feel like I have done a full circle really, I had international fame, moments of artistic fulfillment, and some real periods of emotional struggles. To me right now is about getting ready for the next ten year cycle, I am taking time, I have got writings on the go but I am working out the story and the kind of artist I want to be to the world  in the future and the message I need to share.

YOUR ALBUM IS NOT A GREATEST HITS BUT A SORT OF MUSICAL BIOGRAPHY. HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THIS?

It is like a self-portrait using all ingredients from the past and how I would like to see myself as a writer and musician. I am slightly allergic to how music sounds at the moment, I am still waiting to hear something that thrills me. Pop music is fun but it’s music to dance to while you burn your calories. I could listen to Nicki Minaj but only to help me lose weight. This is why I needed to do something pure, stripped down, and this is how I respond to pop culture at the moment. I knew I was on the right path after I attended Edward Munch’s exhibition at the Tate Modern. I was just finishing the album and questioning the project when in a little room there was the same picture painted and re-explored over a period of sixty years, one in ink, the second in charcoal, then watercolor and oil. My mother is a painter and she explained that some artists have an idea and then feel to tell it in a different way, as a different story. I am not comparing myself to him but he painted and was rejected a lot. I always like stories like that where people don’t care about what everybody else is telling you.

THE ALBUM IS CLEARLY DIVIDED INTO TWO OPPOSITE MOODS. SUNDARK IS MELANCHOLIC WHEREAS RIVERLIGHT IS MORE JOYOUS AND FULL OF LOVE. HOW DO THESE TWO DIFFERENT KIND OF INSPIRATIONS AFFECT YOUR CREATIVITY?

I think that songs always come out from something so overwhelming that I can’t do anything but write about it. Back at those angry days at school, I felt like writing songs was a way to extract all this internal fear and self hatred from my body. It was the same when I fell deeply in love, you feel something so deep that you don’t know how to cope with it, or express it. It is so intense to live with so, making it external it becomes something that once I pass it on to the audience I feel like I have passed this sorrow or happiness. I have always been attracted to songs that even if they were the most depressingly, they had some offer of hope in them. Any of my song like “The City” or “The Magic Position”, have a sense of loss and sadness. I fucking hate one sided songs on happiness and joy. My album is not about sunshine and darkness, Riverlight expresses the river as a vacuum of light but still you are getting reflections from a dark source. Sundark means light, but it is darkness coming from a light source. It is not emotionally one sided

WE SEE A GUSLI ON THE COVER OF THE ALBUM, AN INSTRUMENT GIVEN TO YOU BY A RUSSIAN FAN. “BERMONDSEY STREET” ALSO FEATURES A SPOKEN INTRO IN RUSSIAN. HOW DO YOU NURTURE THIS RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR FANS?

When I go to Poland or Russia I am aware that what is irrelevant to England and Western countries, becomes very used to the development of civil rights and equal politics elsewhere. Poland is coming out of the communist era, it never had the 60s, punk, rock and roll, or Madonna doing “Like a Virgin” so they really need to have a rebellious experience through music. The new version of the song may be kind of irrelevant here but I know that with the internet and people listening to it, it means a lot to my Russian and Polish young fans. Messages I have written, like in “Hard Times” and “The Libertines” are relevant to them and when I go there they need to see someone on stage that is openly gay and does not give a fuck about being arrested or fined. Someone that inspires to have a bit of courage every now and then. I was not here for the 60s and 70s in England or America but I am here now and it is exciting because I used to think that I was not made for the music industry right now as it developed into a generic, commercial, and conservative industry. A part of the country still needs a rebellious character pushing things forward for them.

HOW DIFFERENT IS THIS ACOUSTIC TOUR COMPARED TO YOUR PAST SHOWS?

I miss the movements of my body working big stages and getting people moving, that is something I’ve leant to do pretty well in the last ten years and it is like a second nature to me. What I lost as a sacrifice is my instruments and my training as a musician. This tour for me is hectic on a different scale. I use a lot my hands and my articulation with the instruments is very intense from the grand piano to the ukelele, viola, and harp. I am really working the instruments in a more skilled and crafted way. Some people find touring troublesome but for me it is addictive and full of thrills. You realise the difference in passion, culture, and in the way people react to music, how it is very connected a lot of times with national identity and the way they are raised and taught to experience music. I would have loved to take on the road the show I put on at the London Palladium if I had the funds. It was very visual and choreographed but nowadays theater has become primary in pop music and music is second. I want to make sure that this does not happen to me, I am having a period where the visual communication is secondary and I want to make a honest and really well played music that comes from the heart. Big productions take a lot of rehearsal and I find it quite hard to find originality in it every night. Still there are some wonderful things you could do combining music and theatre, but not like Andrew Lloyd Webber does.

TELL US ABOUT THE VISUAL AND FASHION ELEMENTS IN YOUR WORK AND HOW YOU RELATE TO THEM.

I feel very uncomfortable releasing music, naked into the world even though it is in my blood and DNA. My mother used to take me to galleries and I grew with this vocabulary as well as contemporary art and videos. I realised that the opportunity to make an artwork means to have a concept and a reason behind it. It is infuriating for record labels to work with me and I moved on from some of them sometimes because they are not used to deal with someone with such an attention to details, who cares so much about the font, the CD, and the videos. It is an opportunity to communicate for me and I don’t want to do it in a “pop” way. Fashion wise I have taken a lot from Isabella Blow and I am looking for people who just graduated or are about to, people who make fashion not for the industry and according to what colour will be more popular on Grazia, but for their body of work. It is a lot more exciting to commission stuff to young artist, to support them and have something that nobody else can get. I stopped working with stylists and I am working with David Motta, he is not just a stylist but a true visual artist with a clear vision.

IN A WORLD WHERE WE’VE SEEN IT AL BEFORE DOES ART STILL MANAGE TO SHOCK IN YOUR OPINION?

I think the media power aims to pretend that we are not shocked by anything and that it is uncool to look shocked by things right now in these countries but in reality they are ignoring things. Secretly, they are scared by what they see and hear and I am myself a very hard whole package to swallow. What I do is unpredictable and I don’t mean to please them to get any press and it is scary because I am playing my own game. They pretend to not care and ignore artists that they find challenging. There is still a lot of homophobia in the music industry and a very limited idea of what a gay man can be, or a strong woman can be, what a lesbian can be, what a transgender can be. It is a commodity thing and it is hard to understand a powerful and successful woman who performs and produces music without a man behind her or a gay man who is tough, business minded and serious about his art and work. There are still very limited stereotypes for people to fit in and to be turned into a caricature, it is shocking but I don’t give a fuck, I can go on for the next 50 years with this great audience and one day people and culture will be open-minded.

LONDON IS A MUSIC, FASHION AND ART HUB. WHAT ARE YOUR FEELINGS REGARDING THE VIBE OF THE CITY?

For 29 years I have been based in London but England is in a real cultural and economic recession, music is focused on the past and in the last hundred years, from a huge empire it is becoming like a small island with a very big ego. The media doesn’t actually have any power and it is beating itself up. Luckily I get to travel and tour but I love my audience here, I would never confuse them or their level of intelligence with the one of the industry. Television is odd, there is no film industry, and everything is based on reality shows. No more scriptwriters or costume people, everything is a dystopian reality nightmare. At this moment it is falling back into a very conservative decisions making country instead of taking risks and being brave. Before punk, there was a very depressing period in music and films but suddenly an urgency appeared. It has to get worst before it gets better, the culturally plane crash needs to happen and people need to realise that we are really fucked. I have so much faith and love that I think a new cycle and a new movement will happen for England, I have been raised here but I feel that it is relying on the fact that it is Great Britain but it is not so great anymore. It needs to find that greatness again and it doesn’t come from the government or the TV but it comes from the youth and people being pissed off by this country. I definitely want to be a part of it

IN YOUR TRACK ‘LONDON’ YOU SAY ‘I WASH MYSELF IN YOUR GREY RIVERLIGHT’…

I am a Londoner in my blood, I remember wandering the streets at night or in the morning when people got up for work and nobody was out. I was thinking by the river and there are these constantly grey washes of colour that I find quite hard to find anywhere else in the world. The river is grey, the sky is grey, so you are washing yourself in this constant sadness, London is a very sad city. I think the song contemplates suicide but metaphorically is more about rebirth. I wanted to travel and leave London so much and the idea of jumping in the river is like being swept out to sea, somewhere else, to be baptised in this river full of history. It is a song about a point on Waterloo Bridge where you can see both sides and the place where I was born and I want to reborn.

ONCE YOU SAID ‘I AM NOT ABOUT BEING MYSTERIOUS’. HOW DO YOU BALANCE CELEBRITY WITH YOUR PRIVATE LIFE?

I am comfortable with my level of celebrity, if you start being honest about everything it can be overwhelming for a lot of people. There is a lot of fear that someone is gonna find out something about you in a reality obsessed era. It is nice being enigmatic if you choose to be honest with your emotions but not giving everything away. What is not enigmatic is talking about what you had for breakfast and all these things I find boring in celebrities but that people think it is honest. Twitter for example, I will never get into this thing. People prefer to relate to all the personal failures, drama and talk about boring things. I have a very respectful fan base in regards of my relationship with William, he works in the merchandise on tour and they realize that what brings me happiness is something to respect.

IS THERE A CONTEMPORARY BRITISH ARTIST THAT YOU ADMIRE?

There is an artist, Sarah Maple, who really blew me away five years ago. She is a muslim and she lifted the veil to express women’s sexuality through amazing art. There was a lot of controversy but she is brave and makes radical stuff, something that needs to be done, said, and created in art not just for the sake of being controversial. I really like her.

WHO WOULD YOU HAVE DINNER WITH IF YOU COULD CHOOSE ARTISTS FROM THE PAST AS GUESTS?

Quentin Crisp, he is endearing and I would be fascinated to meet him, he was a writer, a dreamer, and a true character. John Cocteau, I am really obsessed with everything he made. Clark Gable, I could be his Scarlett O’Hara for the night as I recently discovered the film Gone with the Wind, I  have been told to watch it for years and I will definitely take this beautiful film even on a deserted island. Also Orlando, I love that film, the protagonist goes through period of changes in gender, in time, and the message is that you can be all these people within a lifetime. Masculine, feminine, war, and love, I think it is a very good metaphor for life. Back to the guests, Lucia Pamela, an amazing blues and jazz singer who told the world through an insane sounding album about a journey to the moon on a pink Cadillac. I would definitely like to ask her questions. Then Joni Mitchell of course.

WHAT KIND OF ART INSPIRES YOU NOW?

I always liked paintings by Peter Doig, I think I relate to those moments of solitude within nature. His characters are always alone and lost in nature but his work also brings to life a lot of fantasies. I would love, love, love to buy one of his paintings. When I was young I had to leave my school very quickly as things were getting violent and the only other place available was in the country. I was escaping to the countryside, in the middle of nowhere and that is where I found I was alone but not lonely in nature. I started to learn how to play the harp and in this solitude I could think, learn, and dream about things.

WHAT CAN WE EXPECT FROM YOUR NEXT CHAPTER?

It is going to be an apocalypse, a total restart. No one will recognise it or even recognise me. I need to explore and come back with a total regeneration for it. From 29 to 39 is a very exciting period to turn everything I have learnt into practice. This comes from the overview I took of my work and realizing all the things I have explored and all the ones I need to explore.

WHAT ARE YOU HUNGRY FOR?

I am hungry for a new wave of artists and musicians. I really want to see a wonderful five, ten years movement of art, music, and fashion coming together. I am not talking about a successful band but artists that feel revolutionary. Everything is ready, the technology is ready, the politics are bad enough so I am sure something amazing will happen to change our generation. I am waiting for the next happy movement and I would be really happy if something meaningful that would make history will happen. I am optimistic and I can see that all the signs are right.

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Skunk Anansie / Black Traffic Tour / Live in London @ Brixton Academy

 

Skunk Anansie wrapped up their tour in their hometown and if you think it is London you are not entirely right. Skin was actually playing in the neighborhood where she grew up, Brixton, South London, and she addressed to the London’s Saturday night audience screaming out “Brixton!” at every possible occasion. The atmosphere at the Brixton Academy was hysterically intimate and irreverent, the chemistry on stage so undisputed to make us forget about the ten years gap between 1999 “Post Orgasmic Chill”  and 2009 greatest hits “Smashes And Trashes”

Guitarist Ace comes out first and by the time the tight-seethrough-black dressed Skin comes on stage opening with “The Skank Heads”, the place is set on fire. The crowd stands up immediately and the energy is palpable as the set list unrolls with “I Will Break You” and “I Believed in You” off from their latest studio album “Black Traffic”. The new material sounds powerful and truthful to their punk-brit rock origins and mildly metal infused to make people’s head and hair dance along a frenetic frequency.

“God Loves Only You” from the official reunion studio album “Wonderlustre” is next and Skin jumps, runs, and get closer and closer to the front row. She gives her heart and soul, she means every word she is singing as much as they mean to her fans and seeing her crowd-surfing on several occasions during the show is just a wonderful and mutual energy exchange. A calmer and more soothing mood brought by “I Hope You Get To Meet Your Hero” is a really a “kila!” moment as Skunk Anansie predicted in their statement, “It’s a song about the perils of putting people you love on pedestals. We look forward to playing this one live, gonna be a kila! “. The strings have been arranged by Wil Malone (Adele, The Verve), and the song is a beautiful substitute for the lack of “You’ll Follow Me Down” in the set list.

A trip down memory lane includes “Weak” from 1996 debut album “Paranoid and Sunburnt” and “Hedonism (Just Because You Feel Good)” and from the moment this power ballad with hints of hard rock and grunge starts, it is like living the 90′s all over again. It was a period where music, videos, and especially the charts were full of different genres, variegated, and all equally worthy hits like this Skunk Anansie everlasting one. “Because of You”, a title unfortunately associated to Kelly Clarkson, is haunting and keeps the energy flowing, Skin’s voice is a true gift and reflects her funny and edgy persona that keeps on mocking the guys from security in front of the stage during the concert and inciting the audience to stand up from their seats all together because in this way “you have the power and they can’t do anything”, referring to the security staff telling people to sit down.

The first set closes with another “Black Traffic” track, “Sad Sad Sad” followed by the post-grunge hit “Charlie Big Potato”, a sexy-creepy and visceral tune, a perfect hymn to leave the stage before coming back to “Tear The Place Up” one last time and thank the audience that included Skin’s father for coming to support them in a time of economical crisis. The symphonic and glorious “Secretly” sweeps away everybody once again before Skin’s last and epic crowd-surfing as she entirely performs the closer “Little Baby Swastikkka” among the thousand of people. Screaming the first line “Who put the little baby swastikkka on the wall?” illuminated by a red light, this is one of the most incredible moment of the night.

“If I could get up there I would”, she says to the people on the balcony, but actually it is like she did. The front-woman entertained, shared her love, rage, and energy until the very last second. Skunk Anansie gave a lesson about music, voice, pure entertainment and on the important connection between artist and their fans. Wish more bands were like this and more London concerts as heated as this one. To quote one of their albums and to put it with an hash tag #postorgasmichill

Coldplay / LIVE 2012 CD-DVD / Review

Read it on Chasseur Magazine

“Is there anybody out there?”, asks Chris Martin to a sold out audience at the Stade De France in Paris. This is the beginning of their live / documentary “Mylo Xyloto Tour” DVD/CD, a stunning recording of Coldplay’s 2012 World Tour featuring intimate behind the scenes footages where band members talk about their on-the-road experience as they travel far away
from their families but closer than ever to their fans.
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If you had the chance to see this show live as I did, I am sure you still remember the wristbands given when you entered the venue and how they lighted up in a multitude of colors as soon as “Hurts Like Heaven” started. Thousands of shining lights creating a never seen before connection between the audience and the band. This is how much Coldplay love their fans, they talk about looking at people in the eyes and their appreciation for everybody coming to the show whether they are standing in the front row or sitting at the very back of a huge stadium.
 
This live release is powerful, personal and the live vibe is unconventionally and beautifully conveyed as you travel with them between songs recorded from a rainy Madrid show at Plaza De Toros, Boston, where after “Paradise” they suddenly appear among the seated audience to perform “Us Against The World”, and landmark venue La Cigale in Paris.
 
The hit “Yellow” has a sophisticated and ethereal piano start before kicking off together with the singing audience. The energy is frentic as the colourful graffiti set design and during “God Put A Smile Upon Your Face” Chris, Guy, and Jonny gather around drummer Will Champion as the intro builds up so strongly that the only outcome to expect is the one that actually happens, pure joy and release, ending with the camera filming in slow motion a guitar as it is smashed on stage.
 
The latest material from “Mylo Xyloto” find a new dimension during the show and even the least remarkable track, “Princess of China”, is performed with pathos and passion from Chris together with Rihanna on stage. After “Every Tear is a Waterfall”, Coldplay take a bow and as we see them heading back to the hotel or straight to the airport, it is pretty clear why they are so loved. They keep the audience involved throughout the show, they keep their private life and differences strictly private, and when it comes to music they are aware that a show could a person first or last and they just deliver in a humble and fantastic way.
 

 
 
 

Abel Korzeniowski / Interview

Last Friday I interviewed composer Abel Korzeniowski for Hunger Magazine. It was a wonderful and insightful conversation that is now available on HungerTV

Read it on Hunger Magazine

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Abel Korzeniowski is a translator of emotions into music. Or at least that’s what he should write on his CV. The Polish composer is known the scores of Tom Ford’s A Single Man and Madonna’s directorial debut W.E., both nominated for Best Original Score at the Golden Globe Awards. We talk to the philosophical soul about working with Madonna, pop music and that little thing called the meaning of life.

COMPOSING MUSIC MUST BE A VERY INTIMATE AND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOURSELF AS A COMPOSER AND TO WHAT EXTENT ARE YOU INSPIRED BY YOURSELF AS A PERSON? 

This is a very difficult question. I try to tell stories with my music and it is very important to me that it has and additional depth rather than making just a functional and necessary score for a film. I like to fill it with details that become only apparent after listening a couple of times. The process of writing is also very personal to me and the beginning of it is almost like a religious ritual. This is something I have learned through popular music and that I have discussed with Madonna. A good pop song has an immediate appeal, it does not take ten minutes to begin and evolve. I used to have a much more classical approach but I discovered we can get rid of all this preliminary and go straight into a very deep stream of emotions. There has got to be something unique to my music, I start from a little different point, from the middle.

MADONNA IS AN ICON OF POP MUSIC, WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE GENRE?

My view of popular music is that it can be as precious and valuable as the so called serious music, like classical music for example. I don’t really make a distinction, a piece just connects or does not with the audience. The description is like a language, or a different aesthetic. It is like saying “Bauhaus is much better than Art Deco”, when they are just different elements of the language. Nevertheless, if you write music just for money and without paying attention it would result in emptiness. The main question is what is in popular music that makes it so popular? What is the cause of so many people resonating with certain songs and not with others? This has always been a great question to me and my position right now is that if you compare a pop or rock song to the most famous pieces of classical music, they have the same level of appeal that you can recognise, it is just channeled in a different way.

HOW DOES LIVING IN LA INSPIRE YOU?

This city allows me to relax and that is very important. When I write, I don’t go out or meet with people so it helps when I can see a sunny day outside. It is also important that the city outside is fighting insecurities, doubt, and that anything can happen to you if you are fighting for what you are trying to do. It can be frustrating sometimes but I wouldn’t live anywhere else.

KAAS CHANTE PIAF
 IS YOUR LATEST PROJECT TOGETHER WITH FRENCH SINGER PATRICIA KAAS TO COMMEMORATE THE 50 YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF EDIF PIAF’S DEATH. HOW DID THIS PROJECT START?

I was really surprised that she thought of me to work with because when I think of Edith Piaf I imagine a French composer doing new arrangements so I was really thrilled that she thought my music would be appropriate. We wanted to make them in a more cinematic style, in the way I write my music as well. It was a big challenge because most of those songs are written in a simple stream of thoughts like something you would hear in a bar with a piano or a cafe. What made those songs really interesting was how Edith Piaf elevated them, how charismatic she was within this simple form creating a new emotional level while singing them with her stage presence.

IT IS SAID THAT EDITH PIAF’S LAST WORDS BEFORE HER DEATH WERE, ‘EVERY DAMN FOOL THING YOU DO IN THIS LIFE, YOU PAY FOR’, WHAT IS YOUR MEANING OF LIFE? 

I try to look at life as an optimist and I try to concentrate on the beauty and on the good. One of the main tasks of art in our life is to help us make sense of the world that surrounds us and to put us back into balance in a way. Some unpleasant things in life throw us off balance and when we have a sense of chaos around us we feel despair and shattered into pieces. What I try to do with my music is to put someone back in balance.

GEORGE, THE CHARACTER PLAYED BY COLIN FIRTH IN A SINGLE MAN SAYS IN THE FILM ‘DEATH IS THE FUTURE’. BUT YOUR TRACK ‘THE STILLNESS OF MIND’ GIVES HOPE AND A SENSE OF EPIPHANY. HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THAT? 

This was a really beautiful moment in the film because for an instant, he regains his appreciation for life and he wants to keep on living. This is a moment of victory, fulfillment and he couldn’t be happier. He overcomes a great tragedy and in this way it is a perfect ending. He dies from a natural reason, in a sudden moment, but he really dies happy, achieving his nirvana in a way. It is such a high point in life I wish everybody would achieve.

WAS TRANSLATING EMOTIONS INTO MUSIC FOR THESE FILMS A WAY FOR YOU TO FACE YOUR OWN EMOTION?

Absolutely. What I love about films and how stories are told is that in a few minutes you can tell a much more complex story than in a book of 200 pages for example. In one minute on the screen, if you add the acting, set designing, music, and proper cinematography you can combines all the elements that we have at our disposal in art and we no longer restrict everything to words. This is how I see the world around us and what I love on the screen as well.

DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVOURITE CHARACTERS FROM ANY FILM THAT YOU HAVE COMPOSED FOR? 

When I write music for a specific scene I watch it a thousand of times and I know every detail and little movements of every muscle on the face of the actors. It becomes very intimate for me and visual elements are what inspires me, what I see on the screen, how they act, what they show with their faces, their emotions, this is what I translate. There is a very intimate relationship between acting and what I write. We talked about this many times with Colin Firth because even though we hadn’t met during the shooting, he had this unexplainable feeling after watching the film that music was his counterpart, something completing his character. I watched him many times so every note was born through this process.

‘EVGENI’S WALTZ’ WAS COMPOSED FORW.E. AND CURRENTLY FEATURES IN MADONNA’S NEW LIVE ARRANGEMENT OF ‘LIKE A VIRGIN’. HOW WAS IT COMPOSED? 

This is an interesting story as I came to the project after the movie was shot and the actor was playing on the piano in this scene. Madonna asked me to replace the piece she filmed with my own and it was difficult as we could see the actor playing on screen with his fingers clearly visible. It had to be a piece that would have something original and real and its own personality and fit what we see on the screen. “Evgeni’s Waltz” means a lot to her, it is her favorite part of the show and it seemed impossible at first to apply it to “Like A Virgin”. Surprisingly the meaning of the song has changed despite maintaining the same words. It manages to be valid right now and carries a very different and more mature meaning.

ARE YOU ALREADY WORKING ON YOUR NEXT PROJECT? 

Yesterday I received news that “Escape From Tomorrow”, a small independent film I made with a friend of mine, qualified for the Sundance Film Festival and it will be presented there for the first time. We are thrilled as it is very difficult to get there.

WHAT ARE YOU HUNGRY FOR?

I am hungry for dialogue, for communication. What we do through art is what we really want to do in life and just speaking words is not enough. We need the visual and oral elements, music and sounds. We live in a world that has all those elements in balance so I think that we are happy.

IAMX / The Unified Field / Video

First single from the upcoming 5th album. Great video, not sure about the song.